The Utility Poles

Utility poles hold up cables that transmit fiber-optic data and electricity from their sources to your home. They are very important to the modern society’s infrastructure and are made from specific types of pressure-treated wood to protect them from insect damage, rot, and the elements.

Southern Yellow Pine

Southern Yellow Pine is one of the most common types of wood used in the production of utility poles. The name Southern Yellow Pine refers to a number of yellow pine species commonly found in the Southern United States. The Southern Yellow Pine is one of the most common types of wood used in different types of construction. Despite its feathery weight, Southern Yellow Pine is very dense and strong.

Douglas Fir

This is a coniferous tree that normally grows all over the Western United States and some parts of Mexico. This tree can remain steady even when the trunk has been cut deep. Douglas fir is known for its capacity to put up with huge loads without cracking, bending or breaking due to the pressure, making it one of the best wood materials for utility poles.

Jack Pine

Jack Pines are less common than the southern yellow pines but they are also used to manufacture utility poles. It is a species of pine that is common in the entire Canada and some parts of the Midwestern United States. Jack pines have similar advantages as southern yellow pines. However, they have a lot of knots and tend to decay slightly faster. This makes them less suitable for building purposes.

Lodge Pole Pine
Lodge pole pines are more common in British Columbia and in the Rocky Mountains of the U.S. This tree has similar features as Southern yellow pine. It is straight, tall, and lightweight, making it suitable for making utility poles. On the flip side, lodge pole pine’s bark is a bit thinner than normal pine, which makes it more vulnerable to damage from harsh weather conditions and fires.

Western Red Cedar

Western Red Cedar is prevalent in the coastal parts of the Pacific Northwest. This type of wood is the most economical for the production of utility poles. In addition, Western Red Cedar has a higher-than-average ability to resist insect damage and decay. There is no need for wood utility poles suppliers to add preservative chemicals to the wood and maintain it, which translates to significant savings.a

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